5. Conservation Areas – Designated Heritage Assets

Swale planners encourage people to contact them if they are concerned that unauthorised works are being carried out in a conservation area. If you have concerns then you should contact them.
www.swale.gov.uk/planning-enforcement/

Article 4 direction (see below) withdraws automatic planning permission granted by the General Permitted Development Order.

A Conservation Area is “an area of special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance” as defined in the Planning (Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas) Act 1990, as amended. Some 976 hectares (2.3%) of the Borough are designated as Conservation Areas. There are presently 50 Conservation Areas in Swale.

There is more information about Conservation areas, and a list of them, on the Swale website, many villages have Conservation Areas. There are three in Faversham, all with detailed maps and appraisal and management strategy.

Area Designation Last Review- Appraisal and Management Strategy-
Faversham -Faversham Town 1971 9.9.2004 Faversham Appraisal
Faversham – Ospringe 16.6.1982 9.9.2004 Ospringe Appraisal
Faversham – Preston Next 9.3.1976 9.9.2004 Preston Appraisal

Swale provide advice on their website

Conservation Areas
Additional advice on conservation areas can be found in the Supplementary Planning Guidance for conservation areas.

Home Alterations in a Conservation Area

Swale Borough Council has made Article 4 and 4(2) Directions in some of its conservation areas to give additional protection to certain features of single dwellings that would not normally be protected by conservation area designation alone, but which the Council considers are key elements of the areas’ special architectural or historic interest. These directions can restrict permitted development rights or your right to carry out certain works without the benefit of planning permission.

Article 4(2) Directions apply across most of the conservation area to control unsympathetic change. “Inappropriate alterations not only spoil the appearance of the area but can also devalue a property and those around it.” Planning permission is required for a wider range of alterations.

The following alterations require planning permission on any unlisted dwelling, where the work fronts a highway, a waterway or an open space:

  • The enlargement, improvement or other alteration to the house, including changes to windows and doors.
  • Any alteration to the roof, including the provision of roof lights and changes in roofing materials.
  • The erection of a porch.
  • The provision of a hardstanding.
  • The installation of a satellite antenna or dish.
  • The erection, construction, maintenance, improvement or alteration of a gate, fence, wall or means of enclosure.
  • The painting of hitherto unpainted surfaces.
  • The demolition in whole or part of any gate, fence, wall or other means of enclosure.
  • Planning permission is also required for the erection, alteration or removal of any chimney on the house or on any building within its curtilage.

The Council website points out that

  • Original doors and windows contribute greatly to the value of your property and the character of the conservation area, so should be retained. The removal of traditional timber windows and doors will normally be resisted, as will the installation of inappropriate replacements in aluminium or plastic.
  • Generally, the retention of natural roofing materials, such as slate or Kent peg tiles, will be required.
  • Good quality facing bricks were used throughout the area and should remain unpainted. Permission will not be required to repaint a façade.
  • Proposals for vehicle hard standings will be unacceptable unless they can be located or screened to minimise the impact on the surrounding area. Careful attention to paving and landscaping is required.

The detail is here